"Heaven" by Colleen McDannell

Heaven A History Colleen McDannell, Bernhard Lang

Series:
Yale Nota Bene
Format:
Paperback
Publication date:
05 Oct 2001
ISBN:
9780300091076
Dimensions:
432 pages: 197 x 127 x 32mm
Illustrations:
facsimiles

What do Christians believe they will experience after a virtuous life? What will an eternity in the hereafter be like? In this copiously illustrated, lively book, Colleen McDannell and Bernhard Lang describe and interpret the ways in which believers - from biblical authors to medieval mystics, from Jesus to present-day religious thinkers - have pictured Heaven, not just in doctrine but also in poetry, art, literature, and popular culture. In so doing, they shed new light on both the private and public dimensions of western culture. This second edition includes a substantial new preface relating the book to changing views of life after death in the new century.

Colleen McDannell is Sterling McMurrin Chair of Religious Studies and associate professor of history at the University of Utah. She is also the author of Material Christianity, published by Yale University Press (ISBN 0 300 06440 3, 30.00). Bernhard Lang is professor of religion at the University of Paderborn, Germany, and the author of Sacred Games: A History of Christian Worship, also published by Yale University Press (ISBN 0 300 06932 4, 30.00).

"Heaven: A History offers a whistlestop tour, thoroughly researched and engagingly written, of the extraordinary things Christians and others have believed about life after death... A compendium of fascinating finds from the past." John Barton, London Review of Books "[A] fascinating new study... It is a rich and provocative subject and the authors use it as a springboard from which to examine shifting attitudes toward man and God, within the Judeo-Christian tradition." Michiko Kakutani, New York Times "A fascinating survey of Western culture and a delightful tour of the histories of art, literature and theology." Christian Century "The next best thing to going." Carlin Romano, Philadelphia Inquirer