Suicidal Behavior in Children and Adolescents Barry M. Wagner

Series:
Current Perspectives in Psychology
Format:
Paperback
Publication date:
27 Oct 2009
ISBN:
9780300112504
Imprint:
Yale University Press
Dimensions:
326 pages: 235 x 156 x 19mm
Illustrations:
7 b-w illus.

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In this remarkably clear and readable evaluation of the research on this topic, Barry Wagner presents the current state of knowledge about suicidal behaviors in children and adolescents, addressing the trends of the past ten years and evaluating available treatment approaches.

 

Wagner provides an in-depth examination of the problem of suicidal behavior within the context of child and adolescent behavior. Among the developmental issues covered are the evolving capacity for emotional self-regulation, change and stresses in family, peer, and romantic relationships, and developing conceptions of time and death. He also provides an up-to-date review of the controversy surrounding the possible influence of antidepressant medications on suicidal behavior. Within the context of an integrative model of the suicide crisis, Wagner discusses issues pertaining to assessment, treatment, and prevention.

Barry Wagner is Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Training at the Catholic University of America. He lives in Washington, D.C.

“Wagner has provided a well-written overview of suicidal behavior in children and adolescents…Using case studies to support its points, this book reflects the most current research in the field.”—Anthony Spirito, Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown Medical School


“A comprehensive, scholarly, and well written survey of the major issues in youth suicide, ranging from epidemiology, to etiology, to assessment, treatment, and prevention. The author achieves both a breadth of coverage across these issues and depth in details within each area.”—Ann Garland, Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego