What is Sport? Roland Barthes, Richard Howard, Gilles Dupuis

Format:
Paperback
Publication date:
20 Nov 2007
ISBN:
9780300116045
Dimensions:
80 pages: 100 x 152 x 9mm
Illustrations:
15 b&w illustrations

A little-known gem, the text of Barthes' "What is Sport?" was never reprinted in the Seuil editions of his "Complete Works" - neither the three-volume version nor the later five-volume edition. It is published here in a graceful and faithful English translation by Pulitzer Prize-winner Richard Howard. Originally commissioned by the CBC as the text for a documentary film directed by Hubert Aquin, "What Is Sport?" was written three years after the publication of Barthes' "Mythologies" (1957) and bears considerable resemblance to that earlier work. Some of Barthes' best writing seems to have been inspired by popular culture. Blurring the distinction between high and low, the great French literary theorist asks "What is sport?" In investigating the phenomenon, Barthes considers five different national sports: bullfighting (Spain), car racing (America), cycling (France), hockey (Canada), and soccer (England). For Barthes, sport is spectacle and serves the primary social function that theatre once did in antiquity, collecting a city or nation within a shared experience. The real pleasure of this book, however, lies less in its generalities than in its fleeting, strangely haunting moments of insight.

Roland Barthes (1915-1980) was one of the most influential French writers of the second half of the twentieth century. His seminal works include Writing Degree Zero, Mythologies, Criticism and Truth, S/Z, The Pleasure of the Text, and The Rustle of Language (1984). Richard Howard is the author of eleven volumes of poetry, including Untitled Subjects, for which he received the Pulitzer Prize. He has published more than 150 translations from the French, including works by Gide, Giraudoux, Cocteau, Camus, De Beauvoir, De Gaulle, Breton, Robbe-Grillet, Barthes, Cioran, Claude Simon, Stendhal, and Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du mal, for which he received the 1983 American Book Award for translation.

'... Barthes's words have a querulous but poetic rhythm, as he moves from languid description to staccato inquiry.' - David Goldblatt, Times Literary Supplement