Dundee and Angus John Gifford

Series:
Pevsner Architectural Guides: Buildings of Scotland
Format:
Hardback
Publication date:
20 Apr 2012
ISBN:
9780300141719
Dimensions:
800 pages: 216 x 121 x 43mm
Illustrations:
120 colour illustrations

Dundee is the fourth largest of Scotland's cities and has some of the finest ecclesiastical, public, commercial and industrial buildings in the country, evidence of its Victorian pre-eminence as a port and manufacturing centre. But beyond the city lies rural Angus, possessing fine Pictish and early Christian monuments, major medieval ecclesiastical survivals at Brechin and Abroath, tower houses, castles and country houses from Edzell, with its remarkable formal garden, to the vast Baronial fantasy of Glamis and William Adam's House of Dun. This guide also covers buildings as diverse as the houses of the coastal ports, the high-rise flats of post-war Dundee, Stevenson's Bell Rock Lighthouse and Frank Gehry's unique Maggie's Centre.

John Gifford is Head of Research of The Buildings of Scotland Trust and author or co-author of the Buildings of Scotland volumes on Dumfries and Galloway, Edinburgh, Fife, Highland and Islands, Perth and Kinross, and Stirling and Central Scotland.

"Dundee and Angus is admirably complete as far as descriptions of the buildings are concerned. John Gifford has done an exhaustive job of cataloguing the county inventory of churches, public buildings and houses. He has opened my eyes to many unexpected treasures."—James Stourton, The Spectator

"This is an essential and illuminating work of reference for anyone interested in Scottish architecture and will form the springboard for both exciting excursions and new research."—Simon Green, Country Life

"The quality of Scottish architecture great and small has rarely been better chronicled than in the latest Pevsner architecture guide devoted to Dundee and Angus." Marcus Binney, The Times

"Comprehensive in its coverage, chockfull of fascinating detail, yet clear and readable throughout." Michael Kerrigan, The Scotsman