Managing the Mountains Land Use Planning, the New Deal, and the Creation of a Federal Landscape in Appalachia Sara M. Gregg

Series:
Yale Agrarian Studies Series
Format:
Hardback
Publication date:
12 Nov 2010
ISBN:
9780300142198
Dimensions:
304 pages: 234 x 156 x 23mm
Illustrations:
30 black-&-white illustrations

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Historians have long viewed the massive reshaping of the American landscape during the New Deal era as unprecedented. This book uncovers the early twentieth-century history rich with precedents for the New Deal in forest, park, and agricultural policy. Sara Gregg explores the redevelopment of the Appalachian Mountains from the 1910s through the 1930s, finding in this region a changing paradigm of land use planning that laid the groundwork for the national New Deal. Through an intensive analysis of federal planning in Virginia and Vermont, Gregg contextualizes the expansion of the federal government through land use planning and highlights the deep intellectual roots of federal conservation policy.

More about this title

Managing the Mountains has won the Charles A. Weyerhaueser Book Award for 2010 from the Forest History Society. The prize "rewards superior scholarship in forest and conservation history. Awarded biennially prior to 2004, this annual award goes to an author who has exhibited fresh insight into a topic and whose narrative analysis is clear, inventive, and thought-provoking."


Sara M. Gregg is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library.

Managing the Mountains has won the Charles A. Weyerhaueser Book Award for 2010 from the Forest History Society. The prize "rewards superior scholarship in forest and conservation history. Awarded biennially prior to 2004, this annual award goes to an author who has exhibited fresh insight into a topic and whose narrative analysis is clear, inventive, and thought-provoking."