"The Reformation in the Cities" by Steven Ozment

The Reformation in the Cities The Appeal of Protestantism to Sixteenth-Century Germany and Switzerland Steven Ozment

Format:
Paperback
Publication date:
10 Sep 1980
ISBN:
9780300024968
Imprint:
Yale University Press
Dimensions:
248 pages: 210 x 140mm
Sales territories:
World

Categories:

“A bold synthesis of intellectual and social history which explains the appeal of Protestantism to the German and Swiss cities, the media of its communication, and the means of its establishment.”—Religious Studies Review 
“This book is a stimulating addition to the recent work in urban history, and it offers a new and thought-provoking perspective on the teachings and appeal of early Protestantism.”—History
“Ozment very masterfully combines the history of ideas and social history in a work of exacting scholarship and persuasive argumentation.  It will no doubt become a seminal work in its field.”—The Annals
“This fine study is a pleasure to read, shows an excellent understanding of the late medieval scene, and presents convincing evidence that magistrates and city council leaders were not the ‘motors of reform’ in the cities of Germany and Switzerland…. There is nothing in print in English that is comparable.”—Choice
“A work of unusual interest and value. . . . Essential reading for all students of the Reformation.”—New Review of Books and Religion

“A bold synthesis of intellectual and social history which explains the appeal of Protestantism to the German and Swiss cities, the media of its communication, and the means of its establishment.”—Religious Studies Review

“This book is a stimulating addition to the recent work in urban history, and it offers a new and thought-provoking perspective on the teachings and appeal of early Protestantism.”—History

“Ozment very masterfully combines the history of ideas and social history in a work of exacting scholarship and persuasive argumentation.  It will no doubt become a seminal work in its field.”—The Annals

“This fine study is a pleasure to read, shows an excellent understanding of the late medieval scene, and presents convincing evidence that magistrates and city council leaders were not the ‘motors of reform’ in the cities of Germany and Switzerland…. There is nothing in print in English that is comparable.”—Choice

“A work of unusual interest and value. . . . Essential reading for all students of the Reformation.”—New Review of Books and Religion