Against the Academics St. Augustine’s Cassiciacum Dialogues, Volume 1 Saint Augustine, Michael P. Foley

Format:
Hardback
Publication date:
13 Aug 2019
ISBN:
9780300238518
Imprint:
Yale University Press
Dimensions:
352 pages: 210 x 140 x 25mm
Sales territories:
World

Buy this eBook

You can purchase this title from a number of online retailers:

A fresh, new translation of Augustine’s inaugural work as a Christian convert

“Lively, engaging and accurate translations. . . . There is much in this dialogue and Foley’s presentation of it for contemporary readers to take seriously.”—Erik Kenyon, Bryn Mawr Classical Review

The first four works written by St. Augustine of Hippo after his conversion to Christianity are the remarkable “Cassiciacum dialogues.” In this first dialogue, expertly translated by Michael Foley, Augustine and his interlocutors explore the history and teachings of Academic skepticism, which Augustine is both sympathetic to and critical of. The dialogue serves as a fitting launching point for a knowledge of God and the soul, the overall subject of the Cassiciacum tetralogy.

Michael P. Foley is associate professor of patristics at Baylor University. He is the author or editor of several books, including Frank Sheed’s translation of Augustine’s Confessions.

"Michael Foley’s orchestration of the Cassiciacum dialogues—a four-part translation, annotation, and commentary—renders Augustine’s most important voice, the voice of the seeker, readily available to a broad readership. These are perfect teaching texts, and they are equally compelling for experts.  This welcome return of the dialogues, separate and yet intimately related in Foley’s handling of them, marks the most important literary event in Augustinian studies since Peter Brown’s biography."—James Wetzel, Director of the Augustinian Institute at Villanova University
 

“Yale University Press has excelled in publishing these beautiful volumes. Michael Foley models good translation, deeply engaged with the intricacies of the Latin and yet flowing elegantly and readably across the page. Foley’s commentary introduces the reader carefully and invitingly into these important and complex texts from Augustine’s first years as a Christian writer. They belong on the shelves of all who value the wisdom of the early Christian tradition.”—Lewis Ayres, Durham University