"Crush" by Richard Siken

Crush Richard Siken, Louise Gluck

Series:
Yale Series of Younger Poets
Format:
Paperback
Publication date:
26 Nov 2019
ISBN:
9780300246308
Imprint:
Yale University Press
Dimensions:
80 pages: 210 x 140mm

This collection about obsession and love is the 99th volume of the Yale Series of Younger Poets
 
Richard Siken’s Crush, selected as the 2004 winner of the Yale Younger Poets prize, is a powerful collection of poems driven by obsession and love. Siken writes with ferocity, and his reader hurtles unstoppably with him. His poetry is confessional, gay, savage, and charged with violent eroticism. In the world of American poetry, Siken’s voice is striking.

Richard Siken is cofounder and editor of the literary magazine spork. He received two Arizona Commission on the Arts grants, two Lannan Residency Fellowships, and a Literature Fellowship in Poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts.

"Siken writes about love, desire, violence, and eroticism with a cinematic brilliance and urgency that makes this one of the best books of contemporary poetry."—Victoria Chang, Huffington Post


"Vital, immediate, and cinematic in scope, [Siken's] verse offers sharply observed vignettes of longing, love, and pain."—Library Journal (Best Poetry of 2005)


"Siken’s debut collection derives its energy from the friction among bodies, selves, and lovers. . . . This book will excite patrons and be long remembered. Recommended for all collections."—Library Journal


"Vital, immediate, and cinematic in scope, [Siken's] verse offers sharply observed vignettes of longing, love, and pain."—Library Journal (Best Poetry of 2005)


"A powerful collection of poems . . . at once confessional, gay, savage, and charged with a violent eroticism."—Forecast


Finalist for the 2005 National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry


Winner of the 2005 Thom Gunn Award for Gay Poetry, sponsored by The Publishing Triangle


"Crush is a wondrous, brilliant book. Richard Siken’s poetry is daring in its construction, graceful yet startling in its beauty, and complicit with emotions and states of mind that would have remained unintelligible without him."—Dennis Cooper